wild boar belt buckle

Fabricated Sterling. 1 5/8 x 2 11/16 inches.


This was made sometime ago, I pulled it out of the closet and refurbished it. Perhaps you’d like to wear it? It’s designed to fit a 1 1/2 inch wide belt. It’s made out of 14 gauge Sterling sheet, so it’s very robust. It weighs 1.83 ounces.


The wild boar is perhaps in an usual symbol for us today, however, in the Celtic and Saxon  worlds the wild boar was a symbol of strength and ferocity.  

The boar design is not original. It’s a very literal copy of some old pieces. 

The boar image is acid etched into the silver. The entire piece was covered with asphalt and after it hardened the image was drawn using a stylus to scratch through the asphalt. The whole piece was then submerged in acid and where the silver was exposed the acid etched a deep line.


Here’s the hardware on the back.


And another view highlighting the image. 

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belt and buckle

Sterling buckle, keeper, and leather belt.  Approximately 2.5 inches.  I’ve been out of commission for a bit.  Back in the workshop today for the first time in four months.  It felt really good.  The buckle was previously made, but I manufactured the keeper and cut the belt today.  Not bad for one eye!  Detail highlighting buckle, embellishment, and keeper.Reverse.  Here one can see the dimension and the embellishment.This is the full view of the buckle, belt and the two embellishments.  This can be custom fit to your dimensions.  Note there is only one hole in the belt.  $250

another belt


Fabricated Sterling and leather. The belt, cut from a vegetable tanned cowhide, is just over an inch wide. The buckle is a complete circle. Next to the leather keep is a Sterling wire oval. It’s not functional but looks good.


Detail of the buckle.  Copper rivets were used to attach and secure the buckle.

Here’s the reverse of the buckle.


Bar and hanger embellishment.


The reverse of the bar showing rivet attachments.

  

An additional embellishment. This is a peridot cabochon. 

 

Detail of the placement. 

 
The reverse showing the riveting.   

 

The whole belt for context. 

   

Two more because I like the way it looks. How do you not love it? 

belt hanger

Fabricated silver.  Just over an inch long.

Here’s how it functions for me, although, any number of things could be suspended from it.  The idea is based on a medieval practice.  At that time they primarily were used to hang purses (in lieu of pockets).  When wearing a waistcoat the button holes provide the means to anchor a pocket watch chain.  This belt hanger will work when there are no serviceable buttons available.

Detail in which the rivet and decorative ring are very visible.

belt buckle

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Forged Sterling (1.48 oz).  The tongue is 2″ long.  The buckle fits a 1 1/8 belt.

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The buckle will be attached to the belt with the rivet going through the tongue.  The excess will be trimmed off then.  The loop at the top end of the rivet will stay.  Kind of weird, I know.  But I like the looks.

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This is the loop on the rivet that will stay.  When the belt is worn, this loop will be at the top.

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The reverse.

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The dimension is more visible on this view.  It’s substantial.

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Another angle.

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One last view.  If you’d like it, send me the belt you’d wear it on and I’ll attach it.  If the loopy rivet it too far out there for you I can replace it with a more standard, plain one (see the post from June 20).  $225.

Bog Belt

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This belt buckle was inspired by a bronze buckle that came out of a Saxon period bog in Denmark.  I saw it on display at the natural history museum in LA and thought it a strong form.  The buckle attaches to the belt with a massive rivet.

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